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What Kabbalah Taught Me on Being Chill and Mindful

Years ago in my 20s, I could say that my mind was everywhere. I was achieving my goals, but I would find myself energetically exhausted afterwards. The feelings of dilute and drain were a result of perennial overtime work, and connecting with too many people. 

So three years ago, I enrolled in an introductory course on Kabbalah, an ancient spiritual wisdom available to people of all backgrounds. The course would help its students understand how to receive lasting fulfillment in all aspects of life. To get to this level of fulfillment that many of us crave for, one must practice mindfulness.

 


Photo by Lesly Juarez on Unsplash

 

Being mindful has slowed me down in the most pleasant way I could imagine. It calmed my nerves that I could go on my daily drill and still be chill. Being in a state of chill or mindfulness, whether you are at rest or in action, brings higher awareness of ourselves, others and the situation - in a grander scheme.

Being chill opens our eyes and sheds light to answers even before we ask the questions. It assists us to accept that we can not change others, but only ourselves. In return, we land on the ground with better decisions.

 

Some mindfulness practices from my Kabbalah study are to:

Breathe. Breathing centers us, because the Air element has a balancing quality to it. Breathing deeply aligns us with our Source. It contributes to a strong yet gentle mind. Breathing consciously gives me a gentle push whenever I am passive and steps on my brake pedal when I become a bit aggressive.  That leads to the next point.


Photo by Max van den Oetelaar on Unsplash

 

Try not to be reactive. When someone pushes our buttons or puts us on the spot, try to pause. Allowing ourselves to have time to take it all in - three seconds, three minutes, or even three days  - before responding (to a request, email, fashion sale), gives us more power to respond accordingly. By not being reactive, we will have a better grip on our work, relationships, resources and everything we value.

 

Have and share water.  Water has been associated with spiritual Light. That is why we feel cleansed, and satiated by it. So whenever we feel heavy or something is off, water is a go to. Drink lots of water, or take a shower. Swim, sweat or pee. Have a good cry. Wash clothes. You will be rejuvenated after for sure.


Photo by Linda Xu on Unsplash

 

See that there is always a balance in energy exchange. Even if we get  something for free, there is always a part of ourselves that we give in return. It can be our time, space or energy. We may always get invited to parties,  enjoy good music and nice drinks, but in return, we spend our waking hours and give our presence. When we continuously accept something and we do not (or could not) reciprocate it in some way, it could make us feel like a black hole (think of a friend who always treats you to dinner). Being aware of this energy exchange would be a guide whether to take it or leave it.

 

Share with no agenda. They say that sharing propels the energy circuit and opens ourselves to bigger fulfillment. If we would like our sharing to be truly meaningful, there cannot be any agenda. It is best to share from a place of wholeness, and not get attached to the idea of what we will receive in return and from whom.   


Photo by Jeremy Yap on Unsplash

 

With my study of Kabbalah and practice of mindfulness, I have noticed shifts in and around me. I started feeling more content in all aspects, that the smallest of things I already appreciate. I find myself harder to annoy. My used to be hyperactive mind is now calmer.

These days, I no longer see myself as a cracked glass that leaks water, but more of a new one that always gets a refill and upgrade.

 

Curious about Kabbalah classes, events, books or wellness stuff? You may go to http://philippines.kabbalah.com/events; contact 632-8094217 or visit Kabbalah Centre Philippines at 5921 Alger St, Poblacion, Makati. IG: @kabbalah_philippines

 

Lead photo by Tim Goedhart on Unsplash