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5 Books To Help You Find Work-Life Balance

Whether you work hard or hardly work, we all search for work-life balance. But what if rather than chasing after that, you aim to live a full life instead?

No matter where you are in the career ladder, very few can say that they have a thriving life outside of work. If you’re one of those seeking a way to strike the perfect work-life balance, here’s a little secret – there’s no such thing as the “perfect balance”—but these books will help you live a full, content life.


Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead
Sheryl Sandberg



Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg

The whole idea behind “Lean In” is simple: Women should lean into pursuing what they want, like their chosen career, rather than taking a step back in order to fulfill what they think is expected of them. She gives the example of how women have been unconsciously trained to say no to promotions due to the possibility of getting married and having kids, rather than “leaning in”. She gives examples on how she was able to work hard, and still make it in time for dinner with her family. She also makes the case of imbibing yourself with the confidence to take the leap, even if you don’t have 100 percent of the credentials—because that’s what men do all the time! 


While Sandberg ran into some critics, stating that of course she had the luxury to be able to “lean in” due to her support system and perhaps help around the house, Lean In is still an inspirational read, sort of like a manual for women who want to attempt to have it all.



Big Magic

Elizabeth Gilbert


Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert
From the same author who gave you Eat, Pray, Love, Gilbert wrote Big Magic, which has this as its main premise: All of us are creative. Whether you work in accounting or go mountaineering, being creative is everyone’s birthright, and you don’t necessarily need to leave the comforts of your 9 to 5 and pursue it as your career.


Her approach says that curiosity leads to a creative life, and making time to be creative will make you fully flourish. This is a good book for women who don’t want to feel pressured to have it all, but want a nurturing, “I’ve been there” voice telling them that they can do other things beyond work and taking care of others. 



Becoming

Michelle Obama


Becoming by Michelle Obama
The most admired woman in the world and former First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama has led an amazing life, one that’s full of accomplishment, mindfulness, and struggles—which led her to write a book that is honest and insightful.


Obama’s upbringing shows a woman with tremendous drive and grit. It shows that someone as powerful as Obama, rather than keeping her career as a lawyer to simply make a point that she can “have it all”, she chose to live a full life, one that was intentional, one that she wanted, in service of others. 






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The Power of Now

Eckhart Tolle



The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle

Some might find Tolle’s writing a bit too “new age,” but the whole message of the book is watching yourself—meaning, being intentional and present in all that you do, whether that be doing paperwork in the office, or preparing dinner for yourself. 


The Power of Now doesn’t outright teach you about work-life balance, but what you pick up from it is there is no such separation between work and life—there’s only one life to live, and you should fully immerse yourself in it. 





Smarter Faster Better

Charles Duhigg


Smarter Faster Better by Charles Duhigg



The complete title of the book is Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business. Duhigg makes the case that when you understand why have certain habits and know how to create new ones, those habits will propel you to succeed in both your professional and personal life.


Duhigg gives out engaging stories of companies and ordinary people, partnered with scientific research, that make the tips that he gives actionable and attainable for everyone to do. 



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