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You Can Now Rent This Renovated Seaside Villa From 300 Years Ago!

Check out this beautiful 18th-century restoration project, which now accepts guests and was featured in “Great British Buildings: Restoration of the Year.”


There’s something special and sacred about preserving an old home. It’s about honoring the history that came with the place, and trying to bring it back to its former glory through modern methods and techniques. The restoration of historic buildings is an art in itself, and requires tremendous amounts of time, dedication, and talent.


This is the very thing that the television show Great British Buildings: Restoration of the Year aims to highlight: the most incredible restorations of palaces, buildings, and homes that unfold centuries of history and memories.


One of the projects they showcased in the show is the Belmont in Lyme Regis, a historical maritime home back from 1769, which was restored by British charity organization, The Landmark Trust.


The Belmont | Landmark Trust
The Belmont main house, garden, and observatory tower | Fiona Grant


The Belmont

The Belmont is an 18th century seaside villa that was once owned by a businesswoman, Mrs. Eleanor Coade. There were very few businesswomen back in the 1800s, but Eleanor was a very special and hardworking woman, who brought her father’s dying artificial stone manufactory from bankruptcy to success.


Eleanor did not only succeed as a businesswoman; the special formulation for the coade stones that her company produced transformed late-Georgian architecture. Homes and sculptures from that era were made with the very same coade stones, giving birth to many historical artifacts like the buildings of the Adam brothers, Sir John Soane, and the Wyatt dynasty.


The very same stones were also used to decorate the façade of the Belmont.


Writing room | Bridport News
Dining area | Landmark Trust


Apart from Eleanor, there was another historical figure who made Belmont his home—English novelist John Fowles, whose postmodern works included The Magus and The French Lieutenant's Woman. Because of the immense history that was born from this home, the Belmont just couldn’t be left in ruin or demolished by the community.


That’s why the restoration of Belmont started in 2013, with a simple idea: “To keep complete control of the design element and quality of work needed to do justice to such an extraordinary building,” says Stuart Leavy, Landmark's Craft Team Leader. 


Before and after restoring this durable coade stone on the exterior of the Belmont | Landmark Trust
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Now, after years of research, hardwork, and £1.8 million in funds raised, the Belmont is now open to the public for free. It can also be rented for overnight stays through the Landmark Trust website.


Here’s a look at the Belmont, which was preserved to look and feel like the original home of Eleanor Coade.



You can learn more about the full restoration process of the Belmont and other hundred-year-old buildings brought back to life on Great British Buildings: Restoration of the Year, airing every Saturday, 1 p.m, on Metro Channel, channel 52 on Sky Cable and channel 174 on HD every day.


Catch replays on the following times: Mondays, 5 a.m. and 10 p.m.; Tuesdays, 3 p.m.; Wednesdays, 4 a.m.; Thursdays, 11 p.m.; Fridays, 3 a.m.; and Saturdays, 12 mn.


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